Jackson County, Indiana, History & Picture Archive

Reading: 1886: History of Jackson County, Indiana. Brant and Fuller.

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716 HISTORY OF JACKSON COUNTY.
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made to the church edifice. Total expenditures for buildings,
etc., about $16,000. The remaining indebtedness is only $1,500.
These works are a standing monument of Father Schenk's faith-
fulness, industry and ability; and his standing is such as to
command the highest respect both of Catholics and Protestants.
The schools are in charge of five Sisters of Providence, and
have an attendance of about 175 pupils.

FREEMAN E. SCOTT, a native of Vermont, was born
November 12, 1844. His parents Oshea and Susan E. (Corse)
Scott were natives of the same State. At the age of eight years
he removed with his parents to the State of Massachusetts. It
was here the subject of our sketch acquired the rudiments of an
education in the common schools. At the age of seventeen he
apprenticed himself to a machinist where he learned the trade.
He removed to Indiana in 1866, and was variously employed until
1873, when he engaged in the saw-mill business in which he
continued for three years. Leaving this he was next employed
at his trade in the car shops of the Jeffersonville, Madison &
Indianapolis Railroad, at Jeffersonville, where he remained four
months, taking, at the expiration of this time, an engine on the
road, which he ran for four years. In the spring of 1871 he
took charge of the car shops on the Jeffersonville, Madison &
Indianapolis Railroad, at Indianapolis, which position he held
for two years. It was in the year 1877 that he began the erection
of a stave manufactory and saw-mill at Chestnut Ridge, located
on the Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis Railroad, in Jack-
son County. His brother, F. M. Scott, is associated with him in
this enterprise. They now manufacture about 2,000,000 staves
a year. They also saw about 400,000 feet of lumber a year.
They give employment to about twenty men and boys. In De-
cember, 1883, he was married to Miss Gerrish, the daughter of
Dr. J. W. F. Gerrish. He has one child by a former marriage.
He is a member of the orders of K. of H. and K. of P. In
religion he is a Presbyterian, in politics a Republican.

MEEDY WHITE SHIELDS, late of Seymour, was born in
Sevierville, Sevier Co., Tenn., July 8, 1805. He was the son of
James and Penelope (White) Shields, and a grandson of Stock-
ton Shields, of Virginia, a captain in the Revolutionary war.


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